teapot1

teapot1

Friday, May 4, 2012

I was planning on blogging about this anyway, but then I realized it fit this week's prompt beautifully...


A Home for Strangers


My husband and I spent the day yesterday helping to build a home for strangers.
 

Ever since I learned about Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter’s work with Habitat for Humanity, I’ve been intrigued by the organization and wanted to volunteer with it, but somehow I never did.
 

Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter working at a Habitat site in India. Photo from Habitat for Humanity website.


My husband’s company provides their employees with “service days,” on which they’re given a day's leave with pay to spend working in the community. He and several of his coworkers decided to work with Habitat for a day, and I, being self-employed and not needing anyone’s permission to take a day off, decided to go with him.


For those who don’t know, Habitat is a program that uses volunteer labor to build houses for low-income families. It isn’t a giveaway program; the homeowners are expected to be employed and to be able to make payments on an interest-free mortgage. They also are expected to contribute some of their own labor. The people from the local Habitat organization meet the future homeowners, but most of the volunteers don’t. They remain strangers to us.


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Unfortunately it was a cool, damp day when we arrived at the house at 8:30. Fortunately, we were scheduled to work inside. The frame of the house was complete and the outside walls all up, so we were protected from the elements, though it was a bit chilly inside. We all signed in (necessary for insurance purposes, we were told), and the volunteer supervisor split us up for different duties. Two women began putting up insulation, and my husband and I followed them, using tape to seal it to the studs and installing some of it ourselves. Others went to the second floor to nail up drywall, and two more of his coworkers used a circular saw to work on fitting a frame into a doorway.


After we finished with the insulation, the coordinator asked me and my husband to take utility knives and cut away large globs of insulating foam from the windows and wall joins so that drywall could be installed flush against the walls. “I know it’s a boring job,” he said, “but it has to be done.” That was all I needed to hear. I started going at the pieces of white and yellow foam with my knife. I began to get into a rhythm. It was a good job for an introvert--just me and my knife, close work to concentrate on, no need to try to make conversation with covolunteers or to return over and over to the coordinator to ask for something else to do. When I finished one section I just moved to another.


We broke for lunch, eating our home-packed sandwiches in the car. After lunch my husband headed upstairs to help with the drywall. I returned to my task, roaming the first floor with my knife, slicing around windows, on the edge of the ceiling, at corners where boards joined. I began to enjoy the repetitive rhythm. I heard footfalls and power tools upstairs, and the smell of wood and sawdust reminded me that I love the smell of wood and sawdust.
 

And as I moved through the not-yet-rooms, I tried to imagine what they might look like when the house was finished and the family moved in. The section in the back would be the kitchen. Where will the cabinets and counter go, the stove, the refrigerator? It looked big enough to be an eat-in; where will they put their table and chairs?
 

The house will be cute, I think; small but comfortable. The living room has several windows, and there’s a small enclosed foyer inside the front door with what looks to be a coat closet at the far end. The foyer should help keep some of the cold out in winter and also adds a little touch of elegance. I think there’s also going to be a lavette between the kitchen and the foyer; to my mind that’s a necessity. If you have more than one person living in a home, you need more than one bathroom--especially if one or more persons are female.
 

There are four bedrooms upstairs. I start picturing this as a family with three children, and I imagine the parents happily allowing the oldest one to choose the bedroom he or she wants. I imagine it’s a girl and that she’ll pick one overlooking the small backyard. Then the next oldest will pick. I remember how, when my family moved, I was allowed to choose my bedroom first as I was older than my brother. I try to picture where they will put their beds: facing the door? Looking out the window? What else will they have? Dressers, desks? What color will the walls be painted?


I don’t know anything about the strangers who will call this house their home. Yet in an odd way I don’t think that we’re doing this work for people we’ll never meet. Imagining them moving in, furnishing the house, putting away their belongings, makes me feel as though I know them. I feel like I want to visit them when they’re settled in and see how they fit into the house and how the house fits them.

And I feel like I’m discovering a bit of a stranger in myself—the part of me that really enjoys doing things to help people I don’t know: making prayer shawls, donating time and money to Alzheimer’s research, or working to help build houses. For one who has always been somewhat of a loner and a little afraid of meeting people, it’s been a great way for me to contribute something of value to the world. So I welcome my own stranger, and I look forward to getting to know her better.




20 comments:

  1. What a quiet, yet joy filled day Elaine. My parents worked on a Habitt house or two in florida and she also spoke of how rewarding it was and even imagined the house as you did as she worked there. I too. would have loved the solitary job you got that allowed me to be a part of the whole, without being actually involved. I can make conversation when I have to, but enjoy my solitude just as much. So insightful to flesh out the stranger within yourself taht you are getting to know through your charitable works. A lovely wrap up to a heart warming piece.

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  2. I think you will like her just fine. It seems to me she is a wonderfully warm and giving soul and I have grown to care a lot about her and hers.
    Good for you, Elaine. ♥

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    1. Thank you so much, Jo! The same back at you!

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  3. What a great experience! You really are such a good egg. :O)

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    1. Thanks, Beth. It is a great experience.

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  4. Interesting post. We have a habitat home in the neighborhood. It is a cozy little house. The family living there now has made it even more homey by planting flowers and rose bushes and a swing set in the back yard.
    Sounds like found a rewarding and satisfying project to participate in.

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    1. Thanks for this comment, Lynda. It's great to hear how a family has taken such care to make the home their own and to contribute to the beauty of the neighborhood. It sounds like you don't have a NIMBY problem in your neighborhood, and that's great. The volunteer coordinator told us that the RI Habitat has built more than 70 houses and they've had only two foreclosures. It just shows that people only need to be given a chance to make it. Thanks for reading!

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    1. Thanks, Claudia. It is a wonderful, and successful, program.

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  6. I once got my hands dirty with a project similar to this. I didn't build a house but I painted one. It took all day and was kind of rewarding.

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    1. That's great, Michael. It is rewarding. Thanks for reading and commenting.

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  7. I was once a metal bender for Habitat for Humanity. It was a lot of fun.

    Catch My Words
    http://joycelansky.blogspot.com

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    1. What's a metal bender, Joyce? Sounds like you need to be strong for that!

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  8. Good for you, helping others in whatever way we can is always admirable. I'm a Carter fan, and it's good to know they're still supporting Habitat.

    New follower here, nice to meet you. Hope you can drop by my blog.

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    1. Hi, D.G. Thank you for visiting. I did visit your "21st Century Women" blog--beautiful pictures. I'll be back. I was also glad to know that the Carters are still doing good things. Thanks for your comment.

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  9. Wonderful post. We have a strong Habitat for Humanity group in Lake Charles, LA but I recently heard there have been a lot of thefts and break-ins surrounding their work and even the finished homes.

    I worked once with a Christmas In April bunch through my church. We helped home-owners make improvements to their homes: painting, cleaning, replacing rotting areas, etc -- all kinds of things. It was fun but hard work. I wear my Christmas in April tees with pride. :)

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    1. Hi Jess. I've heard of Christmas in April--isn't that where you help elderly people with home upkeep and repairs? I think that's a wonderful things to do, too. I'm glad to meet you, and thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  10. That is so awesome! Bless you and your husband for volunteering for such a worthy cause.

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  11. what a wonderful project--i hope the happy family will have many wonderful years in this love built home---just saying hi from the az challenge:)

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  12. What a wonderful thing to vounteer for.

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